Friday, 18 May 2012

Hold on for a thrilling finale...


It's the last day of the blogathon, friends, and what an event it's been: for all of you who have laboured so hard and so long to keep this cauldron of cinephilia on the boil, I salute you. But the end will prove, I know, equal to Alfred the Great's propensity for memorable climaxes, and never fear: there's plenty of room for all, so you won't have to fight for a place on the last day here like Roger and Valerian above, although you might still like to, and that would be your own affair. Later in the day I'll have the winner of yesterday's draw for donor prizes. And remember, there's also still plenty of time to donate, and the bigger and fatter the donation, the more our father who art Hitchcock will smile upon you from...whichever section of the afterlife he currently prefers to reside in.


FLASH: Thursday's Lucky Draw winner was Thomas Bolda! Congratulations, Thomas.

Friday, 18 May

Over in the ceaselessly toiling, malefically hued, smoke-shrouded depths of the Krell Laboratories, mistress of mad science Christianne has given the floor to guest writer Lokke Heiss, who recounts his experience of indulging all of Hitchcock's silent works in 1999, the centenary of the Master's birth.

At the AMIA Student Chapter of UCLA, another cabal of sinister geniuses labours to produce scintillating movie commentaries as well as new frontiers in acronyms: today Jon Marquis reconnoiters Hitchcock's late masterpiece, Frenzy, specifically the immortal scenes of Alec McCowen's attempts to eat, and how they form an ingenious sabotage of traditional exposition, amongst other pleasures.

The bounteous and beatific Brandie of True Classics considers the case of Young and Innocent, one of the more unusual suspects from Hitchcock's run of '30s British classics.

The nefarious mastermind Jaime Grijalba of Exodus 8:2 considers the proliferating similarities between the visuals of Psycho and episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

Speaking of which, Darren at the mOvie blog continues his exploratory reports on episodes of that seminal show, with "A Dip In The Pool", in which the Master collaborated with another hero of a dark and wicked wit, Roald Dahl. And sorry about that last link Darren: html is the devil's work.

Astounding all, the wondrous and waggish Laura attacks from her not-so-secret base at Laura's Miscellaneous Musings to consider Rope, a recent conquest in her efforts to topple the Hitchcock canon.

Not to be outdone, Matthew of The Chiarascuro Coalition sings of the tragedy of poor Margaret, the crofter's wife who makes The 39 Steps an indelibly darker and richer experience...

...whilst W. B. Kelso returns to life just when everyone throught he was dead, with the last of his series showcasing vintage ads and articles, with one of Hitchcock's original obituaries at Scenes From The Morgue, and a commentary on the trailer for Frenzy at Micro-Brewed Reviews...

At Memories of the Future, intrepid voyager through time, space, and mind Jesse Ataide investigates a little case of Suspicion...

...whilst esco 20, aka he who is By Film Possessed, takes a deep, deep dive into Shadow of a Doubt.

The dashingly dextrous disseminator of Dubai, no dubiety, aka Hind Mezaina (see, that's what you get when you encourage me) wraps up a week of wonders at The Cineaste by showcasing a interview with Hitchcock on the television show Monitor, from 1964. A must-watch for Hitch fans.

The indefatigable crew at Limerwrecks come to the end of their journey but not before offering more of what they do best: Jim "Norm Knott" Siergey composes upon a theme of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and Hilary "Surly Hack" Barta sounds off and rounds off.

...and David Cairns contributes his own lines as well as links over at Shadowplay.

The great and all-seeing Ed Howard brings his epic trek through early Hitchcock to an end with the original The Man Who Knew Too Much at Only The Cinema.

Brian Doan at Bubblegum Aesthetics comes through with a piece that boils the Hitchcock touch down to essentials.

Meanwhile, at Hell on Frisco Bay, a whole other Brian speaks of the NFPF, the rise of digitalisation in cinema, and film festivals showing newly restored films he's going to be attending, which I suspect he wrote purely for the purpose of making me feel insanely jealous...

...and at 21 Essays, Lee Price is celebrating concluding an awesome series of posts with a sixth that ties together Hitchcock, Blackmail, the MacGuffin, Michael Powell, and Alma Reville in a great big cinephile slashfic. Seriously, kudos, Lee.

Strictly Vintage Hollywood presents an approximation of Hitchcock's second feature and the only one of his films that is considered lost, the elusive The Mountain Eagle.

The sartorially splendiferous Stacia of She Blogged By Night is another hypnotised by the seductive sway of Rope...

...and Adam Batty at Hope Lies at 24 Frames Per Second joins the ranks peering into the shadows of Shadow of a Doubt; and that site's Hitchcock-a-thon will continue throughout the weekend, like those guests who just won't leave after a party's over, but they're so much fun to have around you just can't kick them out...

...but Marc Edward Heuck of The Projector Has Been Drinking has chosen to celebrate Hitch's showman side, as the master of marketing.

At Silent London, Pamela Hutchinson naturally has the silents of Londoner Hitchcock on her mind, in specific his actual debut as director, The Pleasure Garden.

At U.S. Intellectual History, Ray Hiberski discusses Notorious.

Strictly Vintage Hollywood, not satisfied with rocking our world all week, offers up Mary Mallory's glance at another Graham Cutts and Alfred Hitchcock collaboration, The Passionate Adventure, a project that first brought Hitch into the orbit of the Selznick clan...

...and Sean Gilman brings it home with a glass of Champagne - that is, Hitch's 1928 silent film - at The End of Cinema.

At John McElwee's Greenbriar Picture Shows, part two of a study of the impact made by The 39 Steps in the US upon first release, marking the beginning of Hitchcock's arrival as an international filmmaker...

...and at Cinema Sight, they rage, rage against the dying of the light with two last day posts, as the crew rounds off their top ten of Hitchcock's films with their individual picks for Hitch's absolute best, but you'll have to click to see what they are! And Peter J. Patrick discusses Hitchcock's way with actors, moving beyond that "actors are cattle" jive to study how well he handled stars and got them to play against type. Thanks for all, guys.

KC, not the one with the Sunshine Band but of the far more awesome Classic Movies, has collected together a formidable set of links to pieces on Hitchcock around the web at the moment, including one piece that presents the irresistable what-if notion of Ian Fleming's interest in getting Hitchcock to direct the aborted James Bond film that was later transmuted in Thunderball, and which caused Fleming so much legal heartache.

And in true Hitchcock style, we return to where it all began, as Ferdy on Films hosts guest writer Paroma Chatterjee and her piece on Suspicion.

High Def Digest wraps up that site's buffet of Hitchcock posts for the blogathon with David Krauss' look at Hitch's fondness for one-word titles.

Adam Zanzie of Icebox Movies finally gets his backside around to contributing (I kid 'cause I love, Adam) as he jumps into Hitchcock's visually innovative The Ring, and finds it a mixed experience.

At Shadowplay, David Cairns continues to stun through his dedication in offering a study in Hitchcock's use of vertigo-inducing high and overhead camera angles and aerial shots.

Darren Mooney concludes his survey of the trove of riches that are the episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents at the mOvie blog, with a look at "The Horse Player". All hail Darren!

At Moving Image Achive News, the team there have pitched in to raise consciousness of the blogathon and its purpose, and Caylin Smith takes a look at the film all this fuss is about - The White Shadow. They've also posted a piece on their Facebook page.

At They Live By Night, the mysterious beast whose rampant cinephilia is feared by all bloggers known as Bilge Ebiri writes about perhaps the most atypical and least-known film in Hitchcock's oeuvre, Waltzes From Vienna, and finds the signs of Hitch's grasp on cinematic rhythm glimmering through the costume drama trappings so interesting he wonders if Hitch wasn't a maker of musicals all along...

...and Joe Thompson of The Pneumatic Rolling-Sphere Carrier Delusion hits the end of his drive through Hitchcock-related historical ephemera at 100 MPH, as he takes a leaf through 1933's The World Film Encyclopedia and looks at the entries on Hitchcock, Cutts, and the other neglected heroes of The White Shadow. That's some class scholarship, Joe.

And the charming young Miss Rachel, who is seen so often parading the sunny boulevards holding aloft her cream-coloured light-deflecting mantle that she is now widely referred to by the hoi-polloi as The Girl with the White Parasol, expounds with solicitous delicacy upon the subject of one Miss Ingrid Bergman, who starred in some of those new talking pictures directed by that frightful Mr Hitchcock, and especially one called Notorious, which sounds, well, notorious, but we would not know, as we avoid such vulgar pastimes.

At Kine Artefacts, the eliptically effusive Ellie explores the problems of working with old nitrate film, that delicate, dangerous and endangered material upon which the entire legacy of early movies rests, and celebrates the skill of those who take it upon themselves to save it and store it.

Old salt Buckey Grimm wraps up his series on places where films are stored and restored at Mindless Meanderings with a brief but charming photographic paean to the little workshops where the archivists labour.

And roaring out of times still to come, riding upon a wave of curved space, The Futurist! pauses on adventures only long enough to hurl us his piece on Family Plot, Hitchcock's very last movie, which is darned apt for the last hours of our last day.

36 comments:

Hind Mezaina said...

Hi Roderick - one last link from your "indubitable dabbler from Dubai" (thanks for that description) - http://www.theculturist.com/home/for-the-love-of-film-an-interview-with-hitchcock.html

This one is an interview with Hitchcock from the BBC show Monitor from 1964. Has some fantastic quotes.


Hind Mezaina
www.theculturist.com

D Cairns said...

Another limerick, with limerlinks.
http://dcairns.wordpress.com/2012/05/18/rhymes-and-misdemeanors/

surly hack said...

Good day, Rod. The first of two limericks for today is by Norm Knott/Jim Siergey, and concerns Hitch's television show, Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

http://limoday.blogspot.com/2012/05/hitch-mock.html

Ed Howard said...

My latest blogathon piece, on the 1934 Man Who Knew Too Much:

http://seul-le-cinema.blogspot.com/2012/05/man-who-knew-too-much-1934.html

surly hack said...

And here's the second and (I think) final limerick for today, on Hitch's masterly control of his, um...medium.

http://limoday.blogspot.com/2012/05/manhood-nude-too-much.html

Brian Doan said...

Hi Rod,
Wasn't sure about protocol, but my promised blog piece just went up at:

http://bubblegum-cinephile.blogspot.com/2012/05/anxieties-of-influence.html

Thanks again to you, Marilyn and Farran for doing all this!

Brian said...

Hey! I donated and wrote a piece! I tied the blogathon in with a number of San Francisco Film Festivals with serious preservation angles- and NFPF connections. Plus one paragraph of Alfred Hitchcock-related stuff for good measure.

Lee Price said...

Don't think it was easy finding a picture of a MacGuffin to finish my series! But I'm pretty happy with the one I found. Here's the link to my whole nutty six-part series at 21 ESSAYS:
http://21essays.blogspot.com/search/label/Blackmail

Thanks for a wonderful job to you, Marilyn, and Farran!

rudyfan1926 said...

Here's mine for today
http://strictly-vintage-hollywood.blogspot.com/2012/05/mountain-eagle-for-love-of-film-iii.html

Stacia said...

Good morning -- here is my entry:

http://www.shebloggedbynight.com/2012/05/just-plain-something-alfred-hitchcocks.html

Thanks!

AdamHopeLies said...

Afternoon, our piece is now live. We're continuing the celebrations well in to the weekend too, with three days of Hitchcock-acopia planned.

http://hopelies.com/2012/05/18/todays-the-thing-thats-my-philosophy-alfred-hitchcocks-shadow-of-a-doubt/

Marc Edward Heuck said...

My piece is now live as well, celebrating the hucksterism of Hitch:

http://projectorhasbeendrinking.blogspot.com/2012/05/for-love-of-filmand-filmmaker-marketing.html

Darren said...

No worries at all! Thanks Rod!

Ben Alpers said...

My colleague Ray Haberski (not I!) over at U.S. Intellectual History has a post up about Notorious:

http://us-intellectual-history.blogspot.com/2012/05/notorious.html

Sean Gilman said...

My final entry is on Champagne:

http://theendofcinema.blogspot.com/2012/05/for-love-of-film-on-champagne.html

rudyfan1926 said...

Here's added post from my guest blogger friend Mary Mallory on Passionate Friends

http://strictly-vintage-hollywood.blogspot.com/2012/05/passionate-adventure-for-love-of-film.html

John McElwee said...

Greenbriar's Part Two of "The 39 Steps in America" is up today.

http://greenbriarpictureshows.blogspot.com/2012/05/39-steps-in-america-part-two-greenbriar.html

The Oscar Guy said...

Here are our final two articles:

http://www.cinemasight.com/blogathon-the-hitch-ten-fin/ (our number one films for the Hitch Ten)

http://www.cinemasight.com/blogathon-hitchs-actors/ (Hitch's Actors about Hitch's ability to get actors to play against type and succeed)

KC said...

I post links of things I find interesting three times a week. I have dedicated today's links to Hitchcock news and the fundraiser:

http://www.aclassicmovieblog.com/2012/05/for-love-of-film-iii-fundraiser.html

KC, Classic Movies

Marilyn Ferdinand said...

Guest blogger Paroma Chatterjee discusses Hitch's SUSPICION at Ferdy on Films and for Film Preservation Blogathon.
http://www.ferdyonfilms.com/?p=14413

Josh Z said...

High-Def Digest's final blogathon post is a look at Hitchcock's peculiar fixation with one-word movie titles:

http://www.highdefdigest.com/blog/hitchcock-blogathon-titles/

D Cairns said...

http://dcairns.wordpress.com/2012/05/18/god-sees-all-and-so-do-we/

A reflection on Hitchcock's overhead angles...

Darren said...

And here's the last one.
http://them0vieblog.com/2012/05/18/alfred-hitchcock-presents-the-horseplayer-review/

Thanks to you and the guys for organising this.

Cheers,
Darren

Adam Zanzie said...

FINALLY DONE! Here's my contribution, Rod:

http://iceboxmovies.blogspot.com/2012/05/ring-1927.html

Moving Image Archive News said...

Roderick:
In the hopefully-better-late-than-never category, here's our post:

http://www.movingimagearchivenews.org/support-the-national-film-preservation-foundation/

also highlighted at:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Moving-Image-Archive-News/111340222249053?ref=tn_tnmn

Best wishes,
Peter Monaghan
www.movingimagearchivenews.org

Bilge Ebiri said...

Had meant to get this up earlier, but here's me on WALTZES FROM VIENNA, a much-beleaguered Hitch film I've loved for quite some time now...

http://ebiri.blogspot.com/2012/05/save-last-waltz-for-me-hitchcocks-much.html

Trish said...

Thanks for your Vertigo piece, Rod. It was awesome. I'll be stopping by more often.

Joe Thompson said...

Rod: My last entry is here, from the 1933 World Film Encyclopedia:
http://cablecarguy.blogspot.com/2012/05/hitchcock-he-has-had-non-stop-career.html

Thanks again for doing this.

Rachel said...

Here's a final entry from my blog.

http://thegirlwiththewhiteparasol.blogspot.com/2012/05/performance-spotlight-ingrid-bergman-in.html

Thanks so much for hosting!

Kine Artefacts said...

Phew! Just made it (with a proper excuse: tonsillitis!)

Some gibberish on nitrate: http://www.kineartefacts.com/?p=494

Look forward to contributing more next year.

Ellie
www.kineartefacts.com

THE FUTURIST! said...

Is THE FUTURIST! too late to add this memory of FAMILY PLOT? http://thefuturistiswriting.tumblr.com/post/23325131096

Roderick Heath said...

Thank you, Trish.

Joe Thompson said...

Rod: Thanks for the kind words about my scholarship. I don't see a link on that entry. Did I miss it?

Roderick Heath said...

No, just a technical glitch, Joe - all better now. Thanks for all the work.

Joe Thompson said...

Thank you, Rod, and you're welcome. I just feel bad because I'm still reading and commenting on stuff posted on Sunday. It's going to be a busy weekend of reading.

Sheila O'Malley said...

Rod - I know I'm a day late! I donated, but got derailed schedule-wise in getting my post up on time. But here it is, if you care to link: "The Fat-Headed Guy Full of Pain", an essay on Cary Grant in NOTORIOUS. Great work, everyone, and thank you for this amazing blogathon! http://www.sheilaomalley.com/?p=54702